Trekking with Becky

Three Things to See in Taipei at Night

Taipei's a fascinating city!

Taipei’s a fascinating city!

Taipei’s a fascinating city with so many interesting things to see and do.  Like all major cities, there are all kinds of things to do at night, and Taipei is no exception.  However, I’ve narrowed it down to three things to see in Taipei at night that will be highlights of your trip because they are unique and specific to Taiwanese culture and history.

If you’re a morning person or if you tend to go site-seeing all day like I do, make sure you save some energy for at least one night of your visit to Taipei. 😀

Oh, guess what?  None of them have admission fees – they’re all freebies! 😀  Here they are! :D↓

 

1) Hua Xi Street Night Market

I discovered that night markets are one of Taiwan’s signatory features and of course, Taipei’s night markets are the best.

You can find anything and everything, including tons of cheap street food, Taiwanese cuisine, clothes, massages, souvenirs, accessories, porn/sex shops, and even snake fights!  This market’s most famous food is snake soup, which is exactly what you’re imagining it to be.  I couldn’t bring myself to try it…ugh!  *Shiver!*

Anyway, I liked Hua Xi Street Night Market best, which I heard is Taipei’s biggest. ↓

Taipei's biggest and best night market, Hua Xi Street Night Market.

Hua Xi Street Night Market entrance.

Inside Hua Xi Street Night Market.

Inside Hua Xi Street Night Market.  It is open from 4pm until midnight.

Access: Take the MRT to Longshan Temple Station on Line 5 – the (blue) Bannan Line, then walk for about 5 minutes. 😀

 

2) Longshan Temple

Before you head over to Hua Xi Street Night Market, I highly recommend stopping over at Longshan Temple, which is open until 10pm.

Beautiful Longshan Temple.

Beautiful Longshan Temple.

Getting good pictures at this temple was particularly difficult because of all the people and of course, the lighting.  Although they don’t do the temple justice, here are three pictures that turned out better than the others. ↓

113.jpg2 123.jpg2

109

Of course, I stood out as a tourist.  So many people noticed that I wasn’t a Buddhist or a Taoist, but they had no problem with it.  I couldn’t get over how many beautiful beaming smiles I got from worshipers.  This was definitely the friendliest place I had visited in Taiwan, where I’m very happy to report that I didn’t encounter any spit wads or spitters! 😀

Access: Exit #1 from the MRT to Longshan Temple Station on Line 5 – the (blue) Bannan Line.

 

3) National Memorial to Chiang Kai-shek

Chiang Kai-shek was a nationalist leader and the self-appointed President of the Republic of China, and I found his memorial to be better seen at night.  What do you think?

094.jpg2

Seeing the statue surrounded by light inside leaves quite an impression.  Below is how it looks inside. ↓

085.jpg2

However, the view looking out from the memorial out to the gate, the National Theatre, and the National Concert Hall became my favourite view of Taiwan.  It was this view that gave me the I’m really in Taiwan sensation. ↓

The view from the first set of stairs. Left is the National Theatre, the centre is the gate, and to the right is the National Concert Hall.

The view from the first set of stairs. Left is the National Theatre, the centre is the gate, and to the right is the National Concert Hall.

It’s open until 6pm, so you’ll be able to make it after sunset depending on what time of year you visit.

Access:  Take either the red Tamsui-Xinyi Line (#2) or the green Songshan-Xindian Line (#3) to Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall Station.  Take the fifth exit.

********

All three places are within walking distance from each other.  I recommend starting at either #1 or #3 since #2 is between both. 😀   If you start with #1, Hua Xi Street Night Market since it starts at 4pm, remember that #3, the Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall, closes at 6pm.

However, if your plans/schedule doesn’t permit you to do all three in one evening, I hope that the MRT directions that I gave your for each place will be helpful. 😀  Here’s a good map of Taipei’s MRT system (in English) just in case you need it.

Have a GREAT time, and I’d love to hear about your experiences, as always! 😀

Please like & share:

Enjoy this blog? Sharing is caring!